The Xiaomi Mi A1 Special Edition features a vivid red color

Back in September, we told you all about the Xiaomi Mi A1. As an Android One handset (that’s what A1 stands for) this device features stock Android and will be among the first Android phones to receive updates from Google. In fact, before the ball drops in Times Square in a little over two weeks, the phone is supposed to receive Android Oreo. But that’s not the big news today.

A Special Edition of the Xiaomi Mi A1 has been introduced by the manufacturer. What makes it so special? Glad you asked. This variant of the phone is wearing a vivid red color. Outside of the new color, nothing about …


Huge Apple leak could just as well be someone's vivid imagination

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Apple, as a rule, never says what its upcoming products will look like, be like, or even what they’re called. But months and even years before a new Apple product is scheduled (or expected to) arrive, numerous rumors shape these objects into a vague but somewhat coherent picture. This is how we “know” that the next iPhone will come in three versions, one of which will (likely) have a near bezel-less screen with an under-the-glass fingerprint sensor and a glass back.

These rumors mostly originate from the elusive “sources in Apple’s supply chain,” which usually means either workers at Foxconn, the Chinese company that builds the iPhone for Apple, or various secondary sources such as workers at companies that make iPhone cases and thus have limited prior knowledge of what the upcoming devices will look like.  Read more…

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Incredible hand-tinted postcards capture 1890s Ireland in vivid color

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Image: Library of Congress

These postcards of the sweeping hills, cliffs, and towns of Ireland were created using the Photochrom process, a complex method of imbuing black-and-white photographs with relatively realistic color.

The closely-guarded process was invented in the 1880s by an employee of a Swiss printing company. It entailed coating a tablet of lithographic limestone with a light-sensitive emulsion, then exposing it to sunlight under a photo negative.

After several hours, the emulsion would harden in proportion to the tones of the negative, leaving a fixed lithographic image on the stone. Read more…

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