Huawei Mate 10 and 10 Pro come with SuperCharge batteries that are safety certified


Huawei’s newest high-end smartphones, the Mate 10 and Mate
10 Pro, have a lot of common features – which is not surprising, since they’re
part of the same family of devices. One thing that users will likely appreciate
on the Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro is battery life. Both handsets pack 4000 mAh
batteries that can last up to two days and feature SuperCharge – according to
Huawei, this fast-charge technology can provide “a whole day’s use with a
single 20-minute charge.”

 

Huawei is proud of its SuperCharge technology, announcing
that it’s the world’s first fast charge system to be safety …


Moto GamePad hands-on: Super-charge gaming with the new Moto Mod


Last year, Motorola opened the door on hardware expansion for its smartphones with the launch of the new Moto Z series, complete with support for Moto Mods add-ons. While we got a decent selection of Moto Mod options in that first batch, including some interesting ideas like a portable projector, a modular platform is going to live or die based on the amount of hardware support it sees; would Motorola be in this for the long haul?

The good news there is that the answer seems to be “very much yes,” and 2017 has already seen the launch of a bunch of new Moto Mods, including the brand-new …

Tesla reveals just how owners will be charged to Supercharge

Using a Tesla Supercharger will come with a super charge. Well, that depends on how you define “super,” of course. On Thursday, two months after its initial announcement regarding the payment structure around its Supercharger network, Tesla informed the public of some of the details of how it plans to “make long-distance travel a seamless experience for drivers,” at a cost.

Tesla-Superchargers-ces2017

“Cars have always represented independence and the freedom to travel wherever and whenever people want to go,” Tesla wrote in a blog post. “To enable this freedom, building a charging network that provides quick, convenient, and long-distance travel is critical to the adoption of electric vehicles. One of our top priorities this year is to significantly increase capacity of our Supercharger network.”

So how will it go about doing this? Unfortunately, the answer isn’t quite as straightforward as you might like. First off, Tesla Model S and Model X cars ordered after January 15, 2017 will be granted 400kWh (kilowatt-hours) of free Supercharging credits, equivalent to about 1,000 miles, every year on the anniversary of their delivery. Tesla claims that its research has suggested that 400kWh actually accounts for the yearly amount of long-distance driving the average customer needs.

However, should you be an above-average driver, you’ll be charged “a small fee to Supercharge.” If you’re a resident of North America, pricing remains consistent within each state or province, whereas overseas, pricing is fixed within a country. In most areas of the world, you’ll be asked to pay per kWh, described as “the fairest way to pay for the exact energy need.” But that won’t be the case in all areas of the world — some local regulations require Tesla to charge per minute of usage instead. That said, Tesla says that it’s “actively working with regulators to update the rules.”

Ultimately, this Supercharge charging structure works out to about $15 for a road trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and about $120 from Los Angeles to New York. You can check out additional details about the program here.