Qualcomm says that it is ready to move on without Apple

Back in October, we told you that thanks to the various lawsuits between Apple and Qualcomm, Apple is in the process of designing the 2018 iPhone models without using Qualcomm’s modem chips. Currently, the CDMA versions of the Apple iPhone 8, Apple iPhone 8 Plus and Apple iPhone X use the Qualcomm Snapdragon X16 modem chip. The GSM models of the same phones use the Intel XMM 7480. There is speculation that Apple will turn to MediaTek to replace Qualcomm.

Now, with Qualcomm the target of an acquisition attempt by fellow chipmaker Broadcom, the question is whether Qualcomm is ready to move …


Heres's the real proof that Samsung will move from Galaxy A5 or A7 (2018), to A8 and A8+ naming

Samsung is heavily rumored to skip a step with its midrange Galaxy A line, going directly to an A8 and A8 Plus naming scheme, instead of sticking with A3, A5 or A7 (2018) model titles. 
Releasing an A8 and A8 Plus models would move Samsung’s midrangers in lockstep with the flagship Galaxy S line, simplifying its roster, and leaving users only two choices of size and pricing to pick from in the categories. There is further evidence for this shift, as you can see in the Bluetooth SIG regulatory filing below, for one “Galaxy A8” handset, revealed today. The model …

Move over, fingerprints: Samsung patents palm-scanning

Our bodies have plenty of parts, which are formed uniquely to each individual — fingerprints, irises, ear auricles, our actual faces, palm lines, the list goes on. And phone manufacturers seem to be capitalizing on these like crazy to offer us a crazy variety of unlocking methods, with finger unlock, iris unlock, and face unlock being packed all together in some devices.

Samsung seems to be dabbling in adding an extra biometric scan — palm recognition. The difference here is that it’s not going to be used for unlocking your phone, but merely for password hints.

So, Sammy has filed …

Report: Sprint owner SoftBank agrees to move forward with T-Mobile merger

According to a report from international news agency Agence France-Presse (AFP), the oft-rumored merger between T-Mobile and Sprint is one step closer to being a reality. Japan’s SoftBank, which owns 80% of Sprint, has apparantly reached an internal decision to proceed with the deal. SoftBank, and Deutsche Telekom are discussing a stock swap, which is expected to be announced this month. The German phone company owns 64% of T-Mobile.

The AFP says that SoftBank is looking at ways to get the required approvals from the U.S. FCC and the Federal Trade Commission. A previous attempt to put T-Mobile …

"T-Mobile Unlimited with Netflix On Us" is the next Un-carrier move by the nation's third largest carrier

T-Mobile had hinted that it would be introducing its latest Un-carrier plan on September 6th. Sure enough, the nation’s most innovative wireless operator has once again addressed a pain point and figured out a way for consumers to relieve the pain. This time, the agony comes from carrier bundles. Trying to get consumers to spend extra on mobile bundles explains why Verizon and AT&T have been seeking to buy companies that provide content such as AOL, Yahoo and DirecTV.

Starting on September 12th (hmm, something else is supposed to happen on that date), if you have a T-Mobile One account …

Move over, Intel: Samsung poised to become the world's largest chip maker

Oh, the times we live in! A new report by Nomura Securities says that Samsung is about to surpass Intel as the world’s largest semiconductor maker. Say what? Intel has been at the forefront of chip-making for decades now, but for this past quarter Samsung is projected to hit $15 billion in semiconductor sales, compared with Intel’s $14.4 billion. 

Thus, while sales of Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S line used to form the lion’s share of its revenue and profits just two or three years ago, now it has managed to diversify enough so that more than half of its profits …

Apple's next move: Siri needs to move out

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Siri is lousy at its job.

That’s the conventional wisdom surrounding Apple’s digital assistant, which has counted the iPhone as a primary residence since its 2011 debut on the iPhone 4S (really second debut, if you count Siri’s previous life as a third-party app).

Siri has trouble hearing you, gets a lot of things wrong, and is really only good at telling you the weather. Just ask any iPhone user — whether it’s your stepmom, your roommate, or your Lyft driver, the feature they like to complain about most is almost invariably Siri.

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Hackers can crack your password based on how you move your phone while typing, study claims

A study by Newcastle University claims that hackers can crack your password or PIN code based on the movement of your smartphone while typing. Weird as it may seem, the experts say that during the study, they’ve managed to crack four-digit PINs with 70% accuracy on the first try, and have them guessed by the fifth attempt, relying on nothing more than data collected from motion and orientation sensors. The scientific team also claims that tech companies are aware of the problem, but have no solution to it.

So, how is this possible? Well, apparently by secretly collecting …

Whew! Galaxy S8 lets you move the back key and adjust the home button feedback

With the Galaxy S8 and S8+, Samsung finally ditched the retro physical home button, and got on with the times by introducing on-screen navigation like every self-respecting Android that wants to come with good screen-to-body ratio. Samsung, however, went a step further, and introduced a very intriguing hybrid home key that is still a virtual endeavor, yet has a pressure-sensitive layer and haptic feedback engine underneath it. This way, you can still feel as if you are pressing a physical button of sorts, and you can call the home key from any app by just hard-pressing the respective area …

Is Apple giving up on tablets, or is the new iPad a smart business move at $330? (poll results)

As you an see from the chart above, the tablet market is far from its heydays, and its growth is expected to stall for the sake of laptops, which are projected to grow in shipments. Apple just shifted its tablet strategy this week with the introduction of a new 9.7″ iPad, whose price starts at just $329, compared to $499 before. Most of our survey respondents below think that this is a smart business move, given that the hardware components inside have fallen in price since the days of the Air 2, and Apple’s app and services business is growing leaps and bounds, too. …