Google Contacts updated to work on all Android devices running Lollipop and above

The last major Google Contacts update dates from May when a new UI and lots of tweaks have been added to the app. Today, the developers announced another important update, which is meant to expand the availability of the app to even more devices.

Starting with this update, the Contacts application will be available for download on all Android devices running Lollipop and above. Previously, Google Contacts was only available to Pixel, Nexus, Android One, or Google Play Edition devices via Play Store.

The compatibility with just about any Android device is the most important change …


Lollipop turns out to be biggest Android update yet

A huge crowd feels that Material Design is the only new that came with Android Lollipop but there’s something much more. All you need to do is to check out massive changelog for the new Android release. As per Android Police reports, a total of 128,680 commits have been made so far thereby making this update the biggest one that Android has received as yet.

Android-Lollipop-update

The publication makes a mention of the fact that the changelog would be even bigger, but Google unbounded Chromium WebView from Android, “which counted for roughly half of the changes made to the GPL code in the L Developer Preview.” The changelog can be examined thoroughly at Funky Android.

As per a tweet by Google, Lollipop’s actual launch schedule for Nexus devices, has been delayed to November 12, pertaining to bugs in the system.Not so surprisingly,one can still unofficially install Lollipop, since developers have already come up with AOSP builds for Nexus 4, 5 and 7.

What can be thought of as these massive changelog is a beginning of an entirely new era of Android with its devices flaunting rich software and hardware implementations.

Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8.0

The price is right for the Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8.0. Starting at $229, the 8-inch model is the first Samsung budget tablet to boast a price as modest as its specs. (UK availability has yet to be announced, but the US price converts to around £230.)

Samsung-Galaxy-Tab-A-8.0

Running the latest version of Android, Google’s operating system, the Tab A features Samsung’s robust and user-friendly TouchWiz interface and — on top of that — it offers a few useful and fun software perks. In addition to in-app bonuses for games like The Hobbit: Kingdoms and Pac-Man Friends, the Tab A includes free limited subscriptions to publications such as The New York Times, The Economist and many more. However, the value of the Tab A is on the inside, not the outside.

Like the standard budget tablet, the plastic-laden construction of the Samsung Tab A is unimpressively pedestrian. Plastic builds are Samsung’s M.O., and the Tab A exudes this, managing to feel flimsy and cheap. Despite this, it’s still comfortable, thin, lightweight and compact in size.

Samsung tends to overprice its entry-level tablet models, so the low price tag on the Galaxy Tab A 8.0 is an extremely welcome development. The Samsung Galaxy Tab A is a solid budget tablet that excels in giving you the most bang for your buck.

Design
The Samsung Tab A 8.0’s design is on-trend. It’s slim, lightweight and — to the undiscerning eye — it looks a bit like the iPad Mini. Unlike the Apple tablet, though, the Tab A 8.0 is wrapped in plastic.

Its smooth back panel is comfortable against your fingertips, and its rounded edges make it easy to grip, yet the quality of the plastic gives it a cheap feel. At 0.29-inch (7.4mm) thick and 0.69-pound (313g), it’s not the slimmest or the lightest tablet, but it’s definitely in the ballpark.

On the top-right edge you’ll find a power button with a volume rocker and microSD card slot below it, while the bottom edge houses the Micro-USB port, headphone jack and single speaker.

As an 8-inch tablet, the ability to hold it in one hand is a design benefit of its smaller build. I didn’t have a big issue with this, though I can see how those with smaller hands could have problems comfortably gripping the Tab A.

Features
Running Android Lollipop 5.0, the Tab A features Samsung’s TouchWiz overlay. The skin is user-friendly, easy to navigate, and chock full of software goodies.

It comes stocked with Microsoft Office apps, including Word, Excel and Powerpoint. It’s a nice addition, especially for students and those interested in a portable workstation, however without a keyboard the software isn’t convenient to utilize.

As an owner of a new Galaxy tablet, you get a few free perks. The “Galaxy Gifts” include 3-month trials of Evernote Premium, Audiobooks by Audible and The New York Times, as well as a 6-month trial subscription to The Economist and Blinkist. There’s also in-app bonuses for a few games and select apps. These “gifts” are common for Samsung’s high-end models, so it’s nice to see them on the budget-friendly Galaxy Tab A 8.0.

If you’re already entrenched in Samsung’s Galaxy, the SideSync 3.0 app is useful for streamlining your devices. The app mirrors your phone’s screen, so instead of taking out your phone to respond to a text message, you can simply do so using the tablet. It comes in handy whenever you’re carrying around both devices, but only need to use one.

The Galaxy Tab A 8.0 also features a multi-window function. For a pretty basic tablet, it smoothly handles running two apps are once. Not all apps are capable of utilizing the function, but common, frequently used ones like the Google Play Store, Gmail and Chrome can. It won’t replicate what your laptop can do by any means, but for basic multitasking, it’s a nice convenience.

Hardware
The Samsung Galaxy Tab A houses a 1.2GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon CPU, 1.5GB of RAM, and 16GB of internal storage, with a microSD card slot that’s expandable up to 128GB.

Performance
The Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8.0 isn’t a fast performer, but once settled into a task or activity, it tends to run without a hitch. Checking email, surfing the Web, streaming video and playing simple mobile games are all smooth sailing.

Large games and apps take awhile to load — anywhere from 10 to 30 seconds — and if downloading apps or updates, performance slows down and lag can occur — though this is typical of most budget tablets.

The Galaxy Tab A 8.0 features a 1,024×768-pixel resolution screen with a 4:3 aspect ratio. Unfortunately, text can appear pixilated, though it doesn’t make it hard to read — it’s just a stark reminder that you’re not exactly rolling with the best.

Fortunately, HD video still looks sharp and crisp. However, heavy video-watchers might want to think twice about picking up this Samsung model; the 4:3 aspect ratio adds to letterboxing (the thick black bars above and below the video), meaning the video doesn’t fill the screen, and the solitary speaker provides lackluster audio quality. Also, since it’s on the bottom edge, the speaker is easy to block — though that might be for the best.

Gamers should also be weary of the Galaxy Tab A. In 3DMark benchmarks, it ranked the lowest in almost all tests against comparable models. I didn’t have many hiccups while playing games with the Galaxy Tab A, however these benchmarks indicate that if you’re heavy on the gaming, you can do better.

The standard pair of cameras on the Galaxy Tab A 8.0 are decent for a tablet. Both the rear 5-megapixel and front-facing 2-megapixel cameras produce clear, in-focus photos, but sharpness at full resolution looks soft around the edges and color saturation falls on the dull side.

According to Samsung, the Tab A should last around 13 hours, and based on my experience, I believe it. On a full charge, with moderate-to-heavy use, I got two days out of it. After one test run, the Tab A got 11.1 hours. Check back after we’re done testing it in the CNET Lab for the final result.

Conclusion
Samsung releases more tablets per year than any other manufacturer, so it’s nice to see it finally couple its low-end models with affordable prices to match.

In comparison, the Acer Iconia Tab 8 has a higher screen resolution at 1,920×1,200, and it packs a useful micro-HDMI port. Despite this, the Galaxy Tab A, (aside from gaming) consistently performs smoother for most tasks, rendering it a more practical choice for everyday use.

Samsung’s own Galaxy Tab 4 8.0 can be currently found for $200, and it houses an IR blaster, meaning you can use it as a remote. Yet, the Galaxy Tab A still manages to one-up it with the latest version of Android OS and the included software perks.

Starting at $229, the Samsung Galaxy Tab A doesn’t quite make the list for best tablets under $200, but once the price inevitably drops, it likely will. Until then, it still offers smooth performance and more software goodies than comparable models.

HTC Confirms Desire 510 Sprint, Virgin Models

HTC announces that the popular prepaid Desire 510 won’t get Lollipop – at least, not on the most popular American variants.

HTC-Confirms-Desire-510-Sprint-Virgin-Models

After months of being in limbo, HTC has confirmed that the most popular American versions of the Desire 510 will not be upgraded to Android 5.0, Lollipop.

HTC’s Vice President of Product Development, Mo Versi, confirmed directly to PhoneNews.com staff on Twitter today that the phone will not be updated, and will remain on Android 4.4.4, KitKat.

The HTC Software Updates web site has left the Desire 510 in limbo since its debut. It is sold in GSM and CDMA variants, most popularly sold via Sprint CDMA MVNO Virgin Mobile. Unlike other devices that received definitive status, the Desire 510 has only said “This device is currently on KitKat.”

As of press time, Mr. Versi and HTC have not answered why the device will not be updated. From a technical specification standpoint, there doesn’t appear to be a single feature limitation or compatibility issue with Android 5.0, Lollipop.

Android 5.0 Lollipop adds increased performance, but most importantly, the next-generation Material Design user experience – as well as the formal launch of the Android Runtime, or ART, – the first major rewrite of the Android application language (and its virtual machine), since its debut.

HTC in recent years has tried to turn around the negative perception by the community that it has failed to deliver on Android updates. The company has committed to updating “iconic” Android devices for at least two years. That commitment would have covered older devices that didn’t get updates according to that timetable, such as the HTC One X and HTC One X+ – but it also gives HTC wiggle room to not update capable devices too, and that includes the Desire 510.

HTC rival Motorola has recently begun shipping Android Lollipop updates for devices that pre-dated the Desire 510, including their entire 2013 launch lineup. With devices such as the less-powerful, first-generation, Snapdragon 200 Moto E being updated – the move is yet another competitive advantage loss for HTC. Motorola has said Sprint and Sprint prepaid versions of their devices will be updated in-line with their other carrier coverage.

HTC Confirms Desire 510 Sprint Virgin Models Won’t Get Lollipop

HTC announces that the popular prepaid Desire 510 won’t get Lollipop – at least, not on the most popular American variants.

After months of being in limbo, HTC has confirmed that the most popular American versions of the Desire 510 will not be upgraded to Android 5.0, Lollipop.

HTC-Desire-510-Sprint-Virgin

HTC’s Vice President of Product Development, Mo Versi, confirmed directly to PhoneNews.com staff on Twitter today that the phone will not be updated, and will remain on Android 4.4.4, KitKat.

The HTC Software Updates web site has left the Desire 510 in limbo since its debut. It is sold in GSM and CDMA variants, most popularly sold via Sprint CDMA MVNO Virgin Mobile. Unlike other devices that received definitive status, the Desire 510 has only said “This device is currently on KitKat.”

As of press time, Mr. Versi and HTC have not answered why the device will not be updated. From a technical specification standpoint, there doesn’t appear to be a single feature limitation or compatibility issue with Android 5.0, Lollipop.

Android 5.0 Lollipop adds increased performance, but most importantly, the next-generation Material Design user experience – as well as the formal launch of the Android Runtime, or ART, – the first major rewrite of the Android application language (and its virtual machine), since its debut.

HTC in recent years has tried to turn around the negative perception by the community that it has failed to deliver on Android updates. The company has committed to updating “iconic” Android devices for at least two years. That commitment would have covered older devices that didn’t get updates according to that timetable, such as the HTC One X and HTC One X+ – but it also gives HTC wiggle room to not update capable devices too, and that includes the Desire 510.

HTC rival Motorola has recently begun shipping Android Lollipop updates for devices that pre-dated the Desire 510, including their entire 2013 launch lineup. With devices such as the less-powerful, first-generation, Snapdragon 200 Moto E being updated – the move is yet another competitive advantage loss for HTC. Motorola has said Sprint and Sprint prepaid versions of their devices will be updated in-line with their other carrier coverage.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4 gets Android 5.0.1 Lollipop Update

If you’re using a Samsung Galaxy Note 4, its Lollipop update (Android 5.0.1) is now available in Malaysia. This is specifically for the SM-N910C version that runs on Exynos.

Samsung-galaxy-note-4-Update-lollipop-5.1

The update is more than a GB in size, so you would need to download this patiently over WiFi. Before installation, it would require at least 3GB of free space and be sure to backup your files just in case if anything goes wrong. If you haven’t received any update notification, you can check manually under Settings > About Phone > Software updates.

Head after the break for the Galaxy Note 4 Android 5.0.1 walk through demo.

Youtube Video Here

Nokia N1 second batch 32,000 units sold out in 7 minutes

When Nokia officially released in November of last year who had been concerned about the user, everyone looking forward to this product really comes, everyone wants to know its real price. January 7, Nokia N1 tablet world debut in China, the price of 1599 yuan caused concern throughout the industry, this product in January 8 on the occasion of the official sale were sold, 566,438 people’s attention enough to confirm that Nokia N1 products real competitiveness. During the sale of 20,000 products were sold in 4 minutes 2 seconds, rapid turnover of this product makes the Nokia more faith heart, the subsequent sale will be more popular.

Nokia-N1

January 8th day of the second round of appointments Nokia N1 started, users can rush in at 12:00 on January 15. According to current statistics in this sale Concerned about the number has reached 664,096 people, compared to the number of people concerned about a rush to improve about 10 million people, while 32,000 people in this book all N1 sold out in 7 minutes and 47 seconds. Purchase coverage area has increased from 466 to 492 cities, creating a new record. In addition, users will be conducted this purchase shipped in February 2 years ago is expected to receive, express delivery priority SF, SF areas that do not support will change to EMS or other courier safer.

While the third round of the sale will be at 12:00 on January 22 to open grab.

Nokia N1 has a 7.9-inch 2,048×1,536 touchscreen, powered by an Intel Atom Z3580 chipset with a 2.3 GHz quad-core CPU with 2GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage. The device has 8MP rear camera and 5MP front snapper.

Sony Xperia hardware is never going to get Lollipop

Sony’s bringing Android 5.0 Lollipop to a bunch of its phones. The company confirmed its update intentions for a number of specific models all the way back in October, ranging from the original Xperia Z all the way up to the Xperia Z3 Tablet Compact. In fact, it’s said that every single Xperia Z-series models will eventually be getting Lollipop. And while that’s good to know for owners of those phones, what about all the other Xperia Androids under the sun? Sony’s been less forthcoming about update details for those guys, and we could understand how its silence may be making you a little nervous. This week Sony is finally answering questions about Lollipop on the rest of its Android family, and it’s bad news.

sony-xperia-z-lollipop-5

Sony confirms that Lollipop is only coming to Xperia Z-series models, and those alone.

Even recent non-Z phones like the Xperia E4 (above) we saw launch less than one month ago will apparently have to live out the rest of their lives on KitKat.

While we haven’t seen a formal statement to this effect, the official Sony Xperia Twitter account has delivered the very same news to multiple user inquiries, all with unequivocal “Xperia Z-series only” language.

Android 5.0 Lollipop Tips and Tricks You Must Know

The smarts of Android on screens big and small ,On more than your phone and tablet Android powers your watch, your TV and even your car! We are here with some tips and tricks you must know about the all new Android Lollipop~5.0

Android-5.0-Lollipop-Tips-and-Tricks

Android 5.0 Lollipop is out and it has already found its way to most devices either through the side loading method or through the official OTA route. The new iteration of Android introduces the all new “Material Design” look and feel, featuring lots of animations, creating an entirely new Android experience with some awesome features. Compiled with a bundle of features, it’s the best version of Android yet. If you have it running on your device check out these essential tips and tricks to get the most out of it.

Android 5.0 Lollipop Tips and Tricks Youtube Video >> Here <<

Xiaomi testing Lollipop based MIUI6

Hugo Barra spoke on Xiaomi’s plans for Lollipop, indicating that Mi users would be the first to receive MIUI 6, based on Google’s latest sweet treat. Now thanks to a new post on the MIUI forum, it seems that beta testing is finally getting started.

According to the post, Mi 2/S/A users will be able to try out the beta ROM soon, provided they meet a few requirements such as having “English forums credits over 50” and that they are willing to report bugs to the forum. Of course only a finite number of applicants will actually be granted access to the beta, with a total of 50 testers to be selected by January 30th of 2015. For those wondering why Xiaomi is choosing to focus the beta on an older device, one possibility is that they wished to use older hardware so any performance issues are more visible, though obviously that’s really just speculation on our part. In other words, if the Mi 2 is running flawlessly (performance wise), than getting MIUI 6 working on other devices should be even easier.

xiaomi-mi4-review-aa-17-of-19-710x399

As for what to expect from the Lollipop-based update? While it’s hard to say for sure, we can probably expect new MIUI features alongside many of the under the hood improvements that come with Lollipop. Some of the biggest user-facing changes in Lollipop surround Material Design, although some of the skinned Lollipop ROMs we’ve seen on the market (like LG’s ROM on the G3) have made very little use of the new design language. If an earlier statement from Barra holds true, Xiaomi is working hard to strike a balance between the MIUI skin and the new Material Design elements in Android 5.0. Hopefully this means we can expect the best of both worlds.

For those interested in getting involved with the beta, you can find more information here. Xiaomi fans: what are you hoping to see in MIUI 6? Let us know in the comments below.