New York City's Wi-Fi kiosks have provided users with $15 million worth of free internet service

The 934 Link kiosks that dot the New York City landscape have provided a ton of free data to New Yorkers. The kiosks started operations early last year, and since that time period over one petabyte of data has been employed by mobile device owners in the Big Apple. Based on current rates, that is equivalent to more than $15 million of broadband internet connectivity that has been received for free in New York City.

To give you a better idea of how much data that is, one petabyte is equivalent to one million gigabytes. The amount of data that New Yorkers have used, thanks to the kiosks, is …


A thirsty internet descends upon the South Korean president's hot bodyguard

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As we know, the internet loves hot people. And the latest hot person to capture its attention is South Korean president Moon Jae-in’s new bodyguard.

To be fair, he is very handsome. Also, since he is a bodyguard, he is never photographed smiling, which makes him seem mysterious. Cool!

Anyway, the internet is smitten. Some people have even gotten a head start on their fanfic, which is honestly commendable. The heart wants what the heart wants!

excuse me this is the new korean president’s bodyguard pic.twitter.com/aIJVhZjo28

— elena yip (@elena_yip) May 12, 2017 Read more…

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Internet drops? Here's how to use Chrome's new offline download mode on Android

You know the drill – your in-laws have invited you to visit them abroad, and data roaming charges are killing your carefully selected cheapest wireless data plan, yet you still want to read that awesome lengthy article you saw when you woke up during the subway commute, just like at home. Fret not, as Chrome for Android now makes it much easier to download whole weblinks for offline viewing while you piggyback on your in-laws Wi-fi. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Get the latest version of Chrome for Android from Google Play;
2. Load the …

Chris Evans reading a bedtime story about superheroes is about to break the internet

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We don’t know who came up with CBeebies’ strategy of getting famous actors to read bedtime stories, but frankly they deserve at least several promotions.

We’ve already had three swoonworthy tales from Tom Hardy, and now it’s the turn of everyone’s favourite Captain, Chris Evans.

Here’s a clip of him reading Even Superheroes Have Bad Days:

And here’s a clip of him introducing the bedtime story. Just look at the way his muscles bulge spectacularly out of that white shirt. Also, isn’t his beard perfect?

The full episode airs on CBeebies this Wednesday at 6:50 p.m. Read more…

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The Internet discovered you can swipe to backspace on the iPhone's calculator, and promptly went nuts

How many times have you entered a number in your iPhone’s calculator app, only to enter it wrong, erase it in frustration, and begin the exercise all over again? Hopefully not many, because the ability to swipe left or right on the screen to erase the last digit you entered has been around since at least iOS 4. And iOS 4 is 2010 material! One would have thought people have figured out everything there is about the iPhone calculator by now, but things aren’t always what they seem.

Two days ago, Twitter user @censoredialogue casually posted about the feature, discovering it for himself this …

'SNL' agrees with the internet, turns Harry Styles into a perfect Mick Jagger

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The latest “Celebrity Family Feud” on Saturday Night Live is wall to wall with epic impersonations. Cecily Strong as Liza. Kate McKinnon as Kristen Stewart. Jimmy Fallon double-dipping as two different versions of John Travolta.

But Harry Styles is the winner because SNL accepted what the internet already knew: he’s basically Mick Jagger. I mean… this might not be the most accurate picture of the Rolling Stones frontman circa 1977, but it’s funny.

Even when the camera’s not directly on Styles, he’s owning the sketch. Look at this. Just look at it. What is he doing??

Read more…

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Sapphire Blue Moto G5 leaks out, Internet still obsessed with Product Red iPhone

Ever thought the Moto G5 lacked a bit of Blue at launch? You are not the only one. That’s why Lenovo is prepping to launch the affordable phone in a “Blue Sapphire” color variant sometime soon.

Promotional images of the handset showed up online, presenting a very blue Moto G5. It’s so blue, it’d sing about baby leaving it while wailing away on a rusty harmonica. 
Still, it could turn out to be a breath of fresh air among the onslaught of crimson red phones that will inevitably follow Apple’s latest announcement in a few months.

No changes beyond …

Delivery Hero acquires Foodpanda as Rocket Internet shuffles online takeout pack once again


Delivery Hero Rocket Internet has shuffled the online takeout pack of cards once again. This time the publicly-listed German ‘startup factory’ and investor is selling foodpanda to its much larger rival Delivery Hero, of which it also holds a significant stake. Read More

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How to Stay Safe and Increase Your Privacy on the Internet

Internet freedom is a concept that many people take for granted. It feels so commonplace that many forget how easy it is for that freedom to result in a loss of privacy or worse. As the internet becomes even more entangled with everyday life, it becomes more and more important to be wary of how you are protecting yourself and your information online. It is not enough to trust websites, browsers, and internet service providers to do it for you. In fact, you should not trust them because their default privacy settings are lacking to say the least. As an empowered internet user, it is your responsibility to take as much control of your privacy as you can. Here are five ways to do just that:

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1. Change Your Browser Settings

Every browser has configuration settings for privacy and security. Head to browser settings and make the following changes to improve your security: Set your browser settings to avoid accepting ‘cookies’ from sites you have not visited before. It is generally safe to accept cookies from sites you visit, but you want the option to reject them in the even you click on a bad link. Next, turn on the settings that clear cookies when you end your session or close the window. If you are looking for a plug-in with maximum security, check out the HTTPS Everywhere plug-in created by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. It provides encryption between your computer and the server you are connecting to. This means it keeps your browsing as close to private as possible.

2. Change Your Social Media Settings

Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram all have privacy settings that are updated regularly for both the desktop site and the mobile app. If you have not looked at your settings in the last year, now is a good time to do so. Head the Privacy Settings section on each of your social media profiles. Decide how much information you want visible to strangers, and update the settings to match your wishes. Facebook’s settings can be more difficult to navigate. Be sure to use the option to view your profile as a stranger to make sure you got everything right. Be mindful that blocking strangers from seeing your data does not protect your privacy completely. Read through your privacy agreements so you know what social media providers share with your consent. Then, tailor what you post online to match what you are comfortable with them having and sharing with other organizations.

3. Add Two-Factor Authentication

Two-factor authentication can mean the difference between safe data and complete and total destruction. Add it to your primary email addresses and to any other application that offers this service. It might not always be convenient, but it will keep your accounts safe. At the very least, you will be the first to know if someone is hacking your account. If two-factor identification does not work for you, create strong passwords and change them regularly. Use a secure password manager to keep track of all your passwords in one place and keep your accounts secure. For added security, you should be using a VPN to mask your IP address, which means intruders won’t be able to locate you. Used with two-factor authentication, this strategy can dramatically increase your online security.

4. Install Software Protection

Spyware and malware are two huge threats to internet security. You should not be online unless you have some type of protection from these software threats. Install reputable anti-spyware products on both your computers and your mobile devices. You can choose from free open-source products or paid subscriptions. Choose the product that best suit your needs and provides the features you need. If you have a lot of sensitive information or participate in certain activities, be sure to choose protection tailored to your needs. Help your anti-virus and anti-spyware products help you by practicing safe surfing. Do not click on strange pop-up windows. Steer clear of weird links. Close windows that ask unexpected questions. Finally, be sure that you are downloading reputable applications from reputable sources.

5. Keep Your Software Up to Date

Software updates present themselves at the least convenient times. But updating your system in a timely manner helps protects your computer against threats. Many updates come with fixes to vulnerabilities in your software found by the software provider or by less savory characters. These vulnerabilities are a problem because criminals can take advantage of any vulnerabilities present and use them as a way into your computer and your data. Software updates address these changes and keep your information protected. Prevent attackers from exploiting vulnerabilities by keeping your software updated. There is no way to fully protect yourself from having your information unwittingly stolen by criminals or sold to advertisers or third parties. But using these five fixes and being aware of what information you provide to whom can go a long way towards protecting yourself and your private information.

Facebook censored a cartoon breast cancer awareness campaign

Facebook still has a thing or two to learn about what’s considered acceptable in your timeline. The social network is catching flak after it briefly took down an ad for Cancerfonden’s breast cancer awareness campaign that included cartoon representations of breasts — and very abstract ones at that (they were just pink circles).

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The company has since restored the post and apologized, but only after Cancerfonden unsuccessfully tried using a ‘safe’ blurry image and posted an open letter that blasted Facebook’s stance. You’d need square breasts to make Facebook happy, the organization argued.

In apologizing for the move, Facebook said that it examines “millions” of ad images each week and sometimes bans them by mistake. There’s no denying that the internet giant has a lot on its plate, and that it would be difficult to completely avoid slip-ups.

However, this is just the latest in a string of incidents where Facebook has been overly aggressive with takedowns, only to backtrack after a public uproar. And this time, it can’t pin the removal on ambiguities in its existing policy — it acknowledged that the original image was fine in its mea culpa.

Clearly, the company has yet to reach that point where it can reliably tell the difference between potentially offensive content and something that’s merely testing boundaries.