Jaguar's electric SUV is actually reasonably priced, cheaper than Tesla Model X

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Jaguar is joining the revolution with its first all-electric vehicle coming out later this year.

The Jaguar I-PACE made its public debut at the Geneva Motor Show earlier this week, and car lovers everywhere are already freaking out. The vehicle has a 90-kilowatt battery that powers the engine for up to 240 miles (only slightly less than the 295-mile range of the Tesla Model X.) The I-PACE will be shown at the New York International Auto Show later this month and will be available in the U.S. during the second half of this year.

The new vehicle joins the PACE series, a family of SUVs including the smaller E-PACE and SUV sports car F-PACE. Read more…

More about Tesla, Electric Cars, Jaguar, Suv, and Geneva Motor Show


Electric scooter folds down into a block you can put under your arm

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The main problem with last-mile transportation options like scooters and bikes is, they’re still really cumbersome to lug around even if they fold down.

Manufacturers are certainly pushing those boundaries. The Cubike is a crowdfunded foldable electric kickscooter that collapses into really small package.

I mean, really small.

It folds into a small package.

It folds into a small package.

Image: cubike

Made by a Shanghai-based spinoff of an industrial electronics firm, the Cubike is a 6.8kg (15 lbs) scooter that is capable of going at 30 km/h (18 mph).

Best of all, the bike folds down into a compact size roughly about an A4 sheet of paper in width. That means it can go into small lockers or get carried around without getting in the way. Read more…

More about China, Scooters, Electric Scooter, Kickscooters, and Cubike

Tesla reveals just how owners will be charged to Supercharge

Using a Tesla Supercharger will come with a super charge. Well, that depends on how you define “super,” of course. On Thursday, two months after its initial announcement regarding the payment structure around its Supercharger network, Tesla informed the public of some of the details of how it plans to “make long-distance travel a seamless experience for drivers,” at a cost.

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“Cars have always represented independence and the freedom to travel wherever and whenever people want to go,” Tesla wrote in a blog post. “To enable this freedom, building a charging network that provides quick, convenient, and long-distance travel is critical to the adoption of electric vehicles. One of our top priorities this year is to significantly increase capacity of our Supercharger network.”

So how will it go about doing this? Unfortunately, the answer isn’t quite as straightforward as you might like. First off, Tesla Model S and Model X cars ordered after January 15, 2017 will be granted 400kWh (kilowatt-hours) of free Supercharging credits, equivalent to about 1,000 miles, every year on the anniversary of their delivery. Tesla claims that its research has suggested that 400kWh actually accounts for the yearly amount of long-distance driving the average customer needs.

However, should you be an above-average driver, you’ll be charged “a small fee to Supercharge.” If you’re a resident of North America, pricing remains consistent within each state or province, whereas overseas, pricing is fixed within a country. In most areas of the world, you’ll be asked to pay per kWh, described as “the fairest way to pay for the exact energy need.” But that won’t be the case in all areas of the world — some local regulations require Tesla to charge per minute of usage instead. That said, Tesla says that it’s “actively working with regulators to update the rules.”

Ultimately, this Supercharge charging structure works out to about $15 for a road trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and about $120 from Los Angeles to New York. You can check out additional details about the program here.

EVs Paris Auto Show open from VW and Mercedes with futuristic cars

The Paris Auto Show is missing Lamborghini, Volvo and other automakers, but it’s still one of the biggest displays of automotive tech in the world. Fittingly, in a city that bans gas-powered cars from its streets once a month, Volkswagen and Mercedes kicked things off with prototypes that represent their future EV ecosystems. That no doubt made everyone feel better about CO2 pollution, but most of the cars here are still burning fossil fuels, and for many, like the Jaguar F-type (below), plenty of it.

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Volkswagen had the first major press conference of the show and CEO Herbert Deiss certainly took a conciliatory tone, without mentioning the diesel-gate crisis. He threw around words like “fresh start,” “new challenge” and so on, adding that VW sales had picked up over the last few months. Then, he revealed the swoopy Volkswagen ID prototype with 370 miles of potential range. However, the collective air went out of the room when he said the EV wouldn’t arrive until 2020.

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Then it was Mercedes’ turn, and it also did a dramatic reveal of its Generation EQ, an entirely new electric vehicle lineup.

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The launch prototype vehicle will never be built, but represents the technology to come in the lineup. Both Mercedes and Volkswagen specifically mentioned Tesla by name as a primary rival, though they’re now playing big-time catch-up with Musk’s company, which has already pre-sold over 300,000 Tesla 3 EVs.

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As for the rest of the show, let’s just take it for what it is: pure vehicular porn. In a quick tour around several pavilions, I saw new models from Jaguar, Lexus (including its wild UX crossover concept), Infiniti, Porsche, Audi and Range Rover, to name a few. Those vehicles are out of our remit in terms of coverage (and price), but it doesn’t mean we can’t throw them all into an ogle-worthy gallery. Enjoy!

Apple Car by 2020

Like the Apple iTV before it, the Apple Car is the rumour that just won’t die. Now Bloomberg is reporting that Cupertino hopes to begin production of an electric car by 2020 according to “people with knowledge of the matter.”

That’s a fast turnaround, particularly for a company with no previous automotive experience – automakers normally spend five to seven years on car development – but Apple is well known for pressuring its teams to meet tough deadlines.

Apple is rumoured to have 200 staff dedicated to the project, which was previously reported to have taken on the codename “Titan.”

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The move would see Apple lining itself up to compete with electric motoring’s big hitters Tesla and General Motors, both of which have 2017 deadlines for vehicles that will travel 200 miles on a single charge and cost less than US$40,000.

Not everyone’s impressed

Despite the rumour’s persistence, the motoring industry remains unshaken. Mercedes-Benz chairman Dieter Zetsche dismissed the rumour, saying a move from Apple into motoring is as likely as a Mercedes-Benz smartphone.

Similarly, former General Motors Chief Executive Officer Dan Akerson warned Apple that the “low-margin, heavy-manufacturing” aspect of the automotive industry should not be underestimated.

Whether it reaches production or not, an Apple Car is something we’d definitely like to see. If only to satisfy our curiosity.